classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).  Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

President and Nuclear Physicist pf Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, pictured here in 1973, was the first African American woman to earn a PhD in Nuclear Physics from MIT (same year as the image).

Mrs. Jackson is also known for holding office as former Chairman of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, appointed by President William Clinton

rachelignotofsky:

Valentina Tereshkova was the first woman, and first civilian to ever fly in space. Illustrated for  my Women in Science series

Get one for yourself here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/196434533/women-in-science-valentina-tereshkova?ref=listing-0

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Vera Rubin! The pioneering astronomer turns 86 today. 

Learn about her career and contribution to the discovery of dark matter in this profile, and in our Dark Matter explainer video

rudygodinez:

Maria  Clara Eimmart, Ten Depictions of Heavenly Phenomena, (late 17th century)

Eimmart was the daughter of the history painter, portraitist and amateur astronomer Georg Christoph Eimmart, with whom she collaborated. Her father was director of the Malerakademie in Nürnberg but also established a private observatory. She was given a broad education in the fine arts, and specialized in botanical and astronomical illustrations. She made a series of some 350 drawings of lunar phases, observed by telescope, and captured on distinctive blue paper. Twelve of these were given to conte Marsili, a scientific collaborator with her father, of those twelve, ten survive in Bologna. She shortly thereafter married her father’s pupil and successor, the astronomer Johann Heinrich Müller and died in childbirth.

ladieslovescience:

rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

This is so cool!

LLS

We often talk about the “leaky pipeline of STEM” as a way to talk about how women and people of color drop out of STEM careers at alarmingly high rates, but it is time to abandon that language. We’re not talking about a passive system here, where people just happen to drip out of the pipeline. No, we’re talking about a system that actively creates pressure. If you take a large pipe, attach it to a smaller pipe and then a smaller one, while still pushing the same amount of water through, what’s going to happen? Either your pipe is going to spring pressure-driven leaks or you’re going to have to have holes drilled to relieve it. We’re not talking about a leaky pipeline of STEM, we’re talking about a gorram sprinkler system, actively pushing out people who were set up to fail from the beginning by the very system itself.

There are very real problems in the sciences. But right now the field is caught in an auto-catalytic cycle, where people point out ways in which we’re failing at outreach, the people in positions of power dig in their heels with cries of “but *we* weren’t offended!”, the same people then wring their hands and wonder why there isn’t more diversity in science… and continue to ignore us when answers to that question are given. And if we keep making excuses for the smaller things that hurt various groups, it’s never goin to change.

Skepchick | Science has an Image Problem (via brutereason)

Posted on July 21, 2014

Reblogged from: Brute Reason

Notes: 490 notes

Salacious Stereotyping of Trans Women Is Not 'Science'

Posted on July 20, 2014

Reblogged from:

Notes: 171 notes

Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault

scientific-women:

Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666) to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

This is a difficult reality to face.  Fieldwork should be a fun learning experience where you build important professional and personal relationships, not another environment where a trainee is on her (or his!) guard.  I hope none of you will need this, but please read this article (full text in the link) and be informed and aware.

If anyone needs to talk about an experience they have had like this, I encourage you to contact your university, or you can always privately message or email us (scientificwomen3@gmail.com).  We would be happy to support you however we can.

Why 'Magic School Bus' Returning to TV Is Fantastic News For Women in Science

Even At Highest Level, STEM’s Leaky Pipeline Failing Women and Black People

autostraddle:

Even At Highest Level, STEM’s Leaky Pipeline Failing Women and Black People

image

Among STEM Ph.D. holders, women and black people are leaving the field in disproportionate numbers, finds a new study by the American Institutes for Research (AIR). The research uses data from the National Science Foundation’s 2010 Survey of Doctorate Recipients, which includes 400,000 participants who earned doctorate degrees in STEM between 1959 and 2010. The analysis shows that a full 20% of…

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